Book Reviews

Volunteering with Your Pet

Reviewed by: 
Kim Roehring

Volunteering With Your Pet gives in-depth information concerning the field of Animal-Assisted Therapy. Mary R Burch, Ph.D. leads the reader through the different elements of getting started in Animal-Assisted Therapy, where to volunteer and how to put together your own program. A major portion of the book gives you a list of not only where to volunteer you and your pet, but also what to expect in these settings, exactly how to deal with the clients and skills you can teach or benefits of pet therapy in that particular setting. While the book deals mainly with dogs and their training, there is a very section concerning the merits of Greyhounds as Therapy Dogs. Dr. Burch also gives you the names and addresses of organizations that are involved in Animal-Assisted Therapy. An added feature to this book is a section that deals with insurance needs and the future of Animal-Assisted Therapy.

Reprinted with permission from Celebrating Greyhounds: The Magazine, Summer, 1997. © Kim Roehring

Reviewed Publication: 

Volunteering With Your Pet

http://www.adopt-a-greyhound.org/sites/adopt-a-greyhound.org/files/publications/books/bc-burch-l.jpg
How to Get Involved in Animal-Assisted Therapy With Any Kind of Pet
By: 
Mary R. Burch
Published by: 
Howell Book House
ISBN: 
0876057911
May 1st 1996

Animals make an incredible difference in a lot of people's lives, and people who bring their pets to people in need often witness miracles. Whether it's a bird or a dog, whether its a prisoner or a kindergartener, there are ways in which all sorts of pets can help all sorts of people. This book discusses all the elements of animal-assisted therapy so that readers can learn what it takes to get involved and make a difference.

Out of Print: 
0
Category: 
General Dog Training / Activities
Volunteering with Your Pet

Volunteering with Your Pet

Reviewed by: 
Kim Roehring

Volunteering With Your Pet gives in-depth information concerning the field of Animal-Assisted Therapy. Mary R Burch, Ph.D. leads the reader through the different elements of getting started in Animal-Assisted Therapy, where to volunteer and how to put together your own program. A major portion of the book gives you a list of not only where to volunteer you and your pet, but also what to expect in these settings, exactly how to deal with the clients and skills you can teach or benefits of pet therapy in that particular setting. While the book deals mainly with dogs and their training, there is a very section concerning the merits of Greyhounds as Therapy Dogs. Dr. Burch also gives you the names and addresses of organizations that are involved in Animal-Assisted Therapy. An added feature to this book is a section that deals with insurance needs and the future of Animal-Assisted Therapy.

Reprinted with permission from Celebrating Greyhounds: The Magazine, Summer, 1997. © Kim Roehring

Reviewed Publication: 

Volunteering With Your Pet

http://www.adopt-a-greyhound.org/sites/adopt-a-greyhound.org/files/publications/books/bc-burch-l.jpg
How to Get Involved in Animal-Assisted Therapy With Any Kind of Pet
By: 
Mary R. Burch
Published by: 
Howell Book House
ISBN: 
0876057911
May 1st 1996

Animals make an incredible difference in a lot of people's lives, and people who bring their pets to people in need often witness miracles. Whether it's a bird or a dog, whether its a prisoner or a kindergartener, there are ways in which all sorts of pets can help all sorts of people. This book discusses all the elements of animal-assisted therapy so that readers can learn what it takes to get involved and make a difference.

Out of Print: 
0
Category: 
General Dog Training / Activities

So You Want to Run Your Sighthound

Reviewed by: 
Laurel E. Drew

If you have ever considered entering your sighthound in one of the various forms of running sports for gazehounds, this could be one of your most invaluable resources. It ranks right up there with having the rule books for the various sports in which you are interested. It's handy for those of us who have been at the games for a while but could use a refresher and reminder as well as for rank novices. 

In addition to basic information on lure coursing and how to do it, Ms. Como provides a brief guide to lesser known running sports such as NOTRA (National Oval Track Racining Association), NOFCA (National Open Field Coursing Association), NPR and ARM racing (for whippets), and even LGRA (Large Gazehound Racing Association) which holds events similar to the whippet straight line racing. These are the best know groups, but others are also mentioned. 

There is good advice on conditioning your hound and on feeding for performance. First aid and veterinary information are given in two chapters. Some of the best sections are the ones on how to actually enter a coursing trial and what to expect and do once you get there. The novice will find this invaluable! 

Hints on starting puppies on chasing the "petroleum hare" are also succinct but very handy. Box breaking for NOTRA and LGRA events is mentioned but needs to be expanded. I believe that this may be done in the new edition which is now in preparation. 

One of the more fascinating sections is a brief breed history and standard for each of 18 different sighthound breeds including the Italian Greyhound plus some information on the American Staghound. Additional "newly discovered" breeds will be included in the new editon, I am told. 

Last but not least, there are useful chapters containing a bibliography of sighthound books and sources of special sighthound equipment. A final chapter lists the addresses of all the national sighthound field sport organizations. 

And, I cannot close without mentioning the clever and thoroughly enjoyable cartoons done by Maryann Conran. They are so true to the breeds and the sport that I giggle every time I look at them. I would love a copy of the closing cartoon of an out-of-shape Greyhound in front of a mirror to hang on my refrigerator! 

So You Want to Run Your Sighthound is a handy little guide which will only get better in the new edition, but if you plan to run your dog soon, don't wait for that. Get this one--and fast!

Reprinted with permission from Celebrating Greyhounds: The Magazine, Fall, 1997. © Laurel E. Drew, El-Aur Greyhounds, Greyhound Club of America Archivist

Reviewed Publication: 

So You Want to Run Your Sighthound

http://www.adopt-a-greyhound.org/sites/adopt-a-greyhound.org/files/default_images/not_available.gif
By: 
Denise Como
Published by: 
the author privately, 1996. $15.00 paperback. To order, write to: Denise Como 741 Lakehurst Ave Jackson NJ 08527
1996

If you have ever considered entering your sighthound in one of the various forms of running sports for gazehounds, this could be one of your most invaluable resources. It ranks right up there with having the rule books for the various sports in which you are interested. It's handy for those of us who have been at the games for a while but could use a refresher and reminder as well as for rank novices. Laurel Drew

Out of Print: 
0
Category: 
Greyhound/Sighthound specific
Review: 
So You Want to Run Your Sighthound
So You Want to Run Your Sighthound

So You Want to Run Your Sighthound

Reviewed by: 
Laurel E. Drew

If you have ever considered entering your sighthound in one of the various forms of running sports for gazehounds, this could be one of your most invaluable resources. It ranks right up there with having the rule books for the various sports in which you are interested. It's handy for those of us who have been at the games for a while but could use a refresher and reminder as well as for rank novices. 

In addition to basic information on lure coursing and how to do it, Ms. Como provides a brief guide to lesser known running sports such as NOTRA (National Oval Track Racining Association), NOFCA (National Open Field Coursing Association), NPR and ARM racing (for whippets), and even LGRA (Large Gazehound Racing Association) which holds events similar to the whippet straight line racing. These are the best know groups, but others are also mentioned. 

There is good advice on conditioning your hound and on feeding for performance. First aid and veterinary information are given in two chapters. Some of the best sections are the ones on how to actually enter a coursing trial and what to expect and do once you get there. The novice will find this invaluable! 

Hints on starting puppies on chasing the "petroleum hare" are also succinct but very handy. Box breaking for NOTRA and LGRA events is mentioned but needs to be expanded. I believe that this may be done in the new edition which is now in preparation. 

One of the more fascinating sections is a brief breed history and standard for each of 18 different sighthound breeds including the Italian Greyhound plus some information on the American Staghound. Additional "newly discovered" breeds will be included in the new editon, I am told. 

Last but not least, there are useful chapters containing a bibliography of sighthound books and sources of special sighthound equipment. A final chapter lists the addresses of all the national sighthound field sport organizations. 

And, I cannot close without mentioning the clever and thoroughly enjoyable cartoons done by Maryann Conran. They are so true to the breeds and the sport that I giggle every time I look at them. I would love a copy of the closing cartoon of an out-of-shape Greyhound in front of a mirror to hang on my refrigerator! 

So You Want to Run Your Sighthound is a handy little guide which will only get better in the new edition, but if you plan to run your dog soon, don't wait for that. Get this one--and fast!

Reprinted with permission from Celebrating Greyhounds: The Magazine, Fall, 1997. © Laurel E. Drew, El-Aur Greyhounds, Greyhound Club of America Archivist

Reviewed Publication: 

So You Want to Run Your Sighthound

http://www.adopt-a-greyhound.org/sites/adopt-a-greyhound.org/files/default_images/not_available.gif
By: 
Denise Como
Published by: 
the author privately, 1996. $15.00 paperback. To order, write to: Denise Como 741 Lakehurst Ave Jackson NJ 08527
1996

If you have ever considered entering your sighthound in one of the various forms of running sports for gazehounds, this could be one of your most invaluable resources. It ranks right up there with having the rule books for the various sports in which you are interested. It's handy for those of us who have been at the games for a while but could use a refresher and reminder as well as for rank novices. Laurel Drew

Out of Print: 
0
Category: 
Greyhound/Sighthound specific
Review: 
So You Want to Run Your Sighthound

Running with the Big Dogs

Reviewed by: 
Terrill Schulcraft

Running with the Big Dogs fills a gap that has existed in available literature about greyhound adoption. In it Lee Livingood discusses greyhound behavior and the reasons behind that behavior, and gives good suggestions on how to make the transition from a working racing dog to family life in the community. She accomplishes this without playing on the pity theme that results in adoptions that don't work out once the adopter's altruistic feelings have subsided. 

What the racing greyhound may not be familiar with is the need to share daily life, night and day, with humans, both adults and children. They may never have seen another breed of dog than other greyhounds. They have probably never lived in a house with a family. They have never in their lives been totally alone -- they've always been surrounded by other greyhounds and, in the daytime at least, many people who are experienced in handling dogs. 

They move into a life where they are expected to be alone for periods of time, where they have more actual freedom to move about all day, and where they are expected to know some words they've never had to understand before, like "Sit!" and "Stay!" Their new owners don't usually have anything near the experience with dogs that racing trainers and breeders have. Livingood shows us how to introduce our hounds to their new life, with many training suggestions that are all based on kindness, positive motivation and no punishment. 

In addition to the training, she discusses supplies the new adopter may need, what problems to look out for and what behaviors may be different from those of dogs bred and raised as pets. There is an excellent resource list at the end of the book. 

She also touches on the special needs of the aging greyhound and how they can be managed. 

All in all, Running with the Big Dogs is a must-have for anyone new to greyhounds and a very useful source for all of us who care for these wonderful hounds. It is illustrated with good photographs of greyhounds learning and playing, and it is well written with humor and understanding. 

The book is currently published in a loose-leaf notebook form, but I understand a spiral-bound edition is in the works.

Reprinted with permission from Celebrating Greyhounds: The Magazine, Fall 1998. © Terrill Schulcraft; Northcountry Kennels, Near Hershey, PA, USA terrills@ezonline.com

Reviewed Publication: 

Running With the Big Dogs

http://www.adopt-a-greyhound.org/sites/adopt-a-greyhound.org/files/default_images/not_available.gif
The Gentle Art of Training Your Retired Racing Greyhound into Your Best Friend
By: 
Lee Livingood
Published by: 
the author privately. 1997 $21.95 plus $4 shipping and handling per copy To order, write to: Lee Livingood 4807 Lancer St. Harrisburg, PA 17109-3231 or contact the author by e-mail at lcl@paonline.com

excerpt from our review: Running with the Big Dogs fills a gap that has existed in available literature about greyhound adoption. In it Lee Livingood discusses greyhound behavior and the reasons behind that behavior, and gives good suggestions on how to make the transition from a working racing dog to family life in the community. She accomplishes this without playing on the pity theme that results in adoptions that don't work out once the adopter's altruistic feelings have subsided.

Out of Print: 
0
Category: 
Greyhound/Sighthound specific
Review: 
Running with the Big Dogs
Running with the Big Dogs

Running with the Big Dogs

Reviewed by: 
Terrill Schulcraft

Running with the Big Dogs fills a gap that has existed in available literature about greyhound adoption. In it Lee Livingood discusses greyhound behavior and the reasons behind that behavior, and gives good suggestions on how to make the transition from a working racing dog to family life in the community. She accomplishes this without playing on the pity theme that results in adoptions that don't work out once the adopter's altruistic feelings have subsided. 

What the racing greyhound may not be familiar with is the need to share daily life, night and day, with humans, both adults and children. They may never have seen another breed of dog than other greyhounds. They have probably never lived in a house with a family. They have never in their lives been totally alone -- they've always been surrounded by other greyhounds and, in the daytime at least, many people who are experienced in handling dogs. 

They move into a life where they are expected to be alone for periods of time, where they have more actual freedom to move about all day, and where they are expected to know some words they've never had to understand before, like "Sit!" and "Stay!" Their new owners don't usually have anything near the experience with dogs that racing trainers and breeders have. Livingood shows us how to introduce our hounds to their new life, with many training suggestions that are all based on kindness, positive motivation and no punishment. 

In addition to the training, she discusses supplies the new adopter may need, what problems to look out for and what behaviors may be different from those of dogs bred and raised as pets. There is an excellent resource list at the end of the book. 

She also touches on the special needs of the aging greyhound and how they can be managed. 

All in all, Running with the Big Dogs is a must-have for anyone new to greyhounds and a very useful source for all of us who care for these wonderful hounds. It is illustrated with good photographs of greyhounds learning and playing, and it is well written with humor and understanding. 

The book is currently published in a loose-leaf notebook form, but I understand a spiral-bound edition is in the works.

Reprinted with permission from Celebrating Greyhounds: The Magazine, Fall 1998. © Terrill Schulcraft; Northcountry Kennels, Near Hershey, PA, USA terrills@ezonline.com

Reviewed Publication: 

Running With the Big Dogs

http://www.adopt-a-greyhound.org/sites/adopt-a-greyhound.org/files/default_images/not_available.gif
The Gentle Art of Training Your Retired Racing Greyhound into Your Best Friend
By: 
Lee Livingood
Published by: 
the author privately. 1997 $21.95 plus $4 shipping and handling per copy To order, write to: Lee Livingood 4807 Lancer St. Harrisburg, PA 17109-3231 or contact the author by e-mail at lcl@paonline.com

excerpt from our review: Running with the Big Dogs fills a gap that has existed in available literature about greyhound adoption. In it Lee Livingood discusses greyhound behavior and the reasons behind that behavior, and gives good suggestions on how to make the transition from a working racing dog to family life in the community. She accomplishes this without playing on the pity theme that results in adoptions that don't work out once the adopter's altruistic feelings have subsided.

Out of Print: 
0
Category: 
Greyhound/Sighthound specific
Review: 
Running with the Big Dogs

The Reign of the Greyhounds

Reviewed by: 
Joan Dillon

Cynthia's first book, Adopting the Racing Greyhound, has sold over 60,000 copies. Now, in The Reign of the Greyhound, she enthralls us with a popular history of the greyhound from antiquity to present day. 

In the early days of recorded history, a number of the sighthound breeds we know today were classified as "greyhounds" with only two distinct types -- rough and smooth-coated. The rough-coated we know today as Irish Wolfhounds or Scottish Deerhounds. Historical references to Italian greyhounds as greyhounds confuses things even more. In this book, Cynthia has done an admirable job in sorting out the various breeds in the greyhound family. 

The Reign of the Greyhound brings to light a number of little known facts including the darker days of greyhound history when Columbus and various Spanish explorers used greyhounds and mastiffs to pursue and kill various natives of the New World. It also gives an extremely plausible reason why greyhounds did not accompany the English colonists to America -- one which makes a great deal of sense. Greyhounds were associated with the nobility and the English colonies were settled by religious dissenters, merchants and tradesman -- hardly the type of people to own greyhounds. Continuing on, we read of the importation of greyhounds to help Midwestern farmers control jackrabbits and of Custer's greyhounds which were sent away in the care of one very lucky soldier the night before the battle of the Little Big Horn. 

Extremely readable, this book flows along very much like a novel with sixteen pages of full-colored photos to add to the reader's understanding and enjoyment. Readers of Celebrating Greyhounds will remember Cynthia's story about Shooter. Here, we see a photo of Shooter in all his glory winning at Westminster. 

My favorite chapter was the last one which dealt with the current phenomenon of greyhound adoption. The symptoms of "greyhound fever" had me in stitches! Phase One is marked by frequent calls to the adoption agency to report on the new dog's daily progress. Phase Two is when the thought arises: If one is good, how much better would two be? Phase Three occurs when the adopter becomes a foster parent and, depending on the severity of the disease, either adopts every foster dog or holds out till one comes along that they just can't let go. In Phase 4, lack of space finally prohibits any further adoption so the person becomes an adoption volunteer fantasizing, "If I had room, I'd adopt this one." 

If you're looking for the perfect Christmas gift for your greyhound loving friends, you need look no further than The Reign of the Greyhound.

Reprinted with permission from Celebrating Greyhounds: The Magazine, Fall, 1997. © Joan Dillon

Reviewed Publication: 

The Reign of the Greyhound

http://www.adopt-a-greyhound.org/sites/adopt-a-greyhound.org/files/publications/books/bc-branigan2-s.jpg
A Popular History of the First Family of Dogs
By: 
Cynthia Branigan
Published by: 
MacMillan General Reference, 866 Third Avenue, New York, NY 10022
ISBN: 
0876056966
Jul 1st 1997

Cynthia Branigan, author of the bestselling Adopting the Racing Greyhound, traces the role of the greyhound from its earliest appearances in classical culture through medieval Europe, the American West, and into the present. Dog lovers will be impressed by this beautiful book, illustrated with historical depictions of greyhounds from every culture. 100 photos. color insert.

*Adoption Groups: This book is available for bulk purchases directly from the publisher

Out of Print: 
0
Category: 
Other Greyhound Books (Non-Fiction)
Review: 
The Reign of the Greyhounds
The Reign of the Greyhounds

The Reign of the Greyhounds

Reviewed by: 
Joan Dillon

Cynthia's first book, Adopting the Racing Greyhound, has sold over 60,000 copies. Now, in The Reign of the Greyhound, she enthralls us with a popular history of the greyhound from antiquity to present day. 

In the early days of recorded history, a number of the sighthound breeds we know today were classified as "greyhounds" with only two distinct types -- rough and smooth-coated. The rough-coated we know today as Irish Wolfhounds or Scottish Deerhounds. Historical references to Italian greyhounds as greyhounds confuses things even more. In this book, Cynthia has done an admirable job in sorting out the various breeds in the greyhound family. 

The Reign of the Greyhound brings to light a number of little known facts including the darker days of greyhound history when Columbus and various Spanish explorers used greyhounds and mastiffs to pursue and kill various natives of the New World. It also gives an extremely plausible reason why greyhounds did not accompany the English colonists to America -- one which makes a great deal of sense. Greyhounds were associated with the nobility and the English colonies were settled by religious dissenters, merchants and tradesman -- hardly the type of people to own greyhounds. Continuing on, we read of the importation of greyhounds to help Midwestern farmers control jackrabbits and of Custer's greyhounds which were sent away in the care of one very lucky soldier the night before the battle of the Little Big Horn. 

Extremely readable, this book flows along very much like a novel with sixteen pages of full-colored photos to add to the reader's understanding and enjoyment. Readers of Celebrating Greyhounds will remember Cynthia's story about Shooter. Here, we see a photo of Shooter in all his glory winning at Westminster. 

My favorite chapter was the last one which dealt with the current phenomenon of greyhound adoption. The symptoms of "greyhound fever" had me in stitches! Phase One is marked by frequent calls to the adoption agency to report on the new dog's daily progress. Phase Two is when the thought arises: If one is good, how much better would two be? Phase Three occurs when the adopter becomes a foster parent and, depending on the severity of the disease, either adopts every foster dog or holds out till one comes along that they just can't let go. In Phase 4, lack of space finally prohibits any further adoption so the person becomes an adoption volunteer fantasizing, "If I had room, I'd adopt this one." 

If you're looking for the perfect Christmas gift for your greyhound loving friends, you need look no further than The Reign of the Greyhound.

Reprinted with permission from Celebrating Greyhounds: The Magazine, Fall, 1997. © Joan Dillon

Reviewed Publication: 

The Reign of the Greyhound

http://www.adopt-a-greyhound.org/sites/adopt-a-greyhound.org/files/publications/books/bc-branigan2-s.jpg
A Popular History of the First Family of Dogs
By: 
Cynthia Branigan
Published by: 
MacMillan General Reference, 866 Third Avenue, New York, NY 10022
ISBN: 
0876056966
Jul 1st 1997

Cynthia Branigan, author of the bestselling Adopting the Racing Greyhound, traces the role of the greyhound from its earliest appearances in classical culture through medieval Europe, the American West, and into the present. Dog lovers will be impressed by this beautiful book, illustrated with historical depictions of greyhounds from every culture. 100 photos. color insert.

*Adoption Groups: This book is available for bulk purchases directly from the publisher

Out of Print: 
0
Category: 
Other Greyhound Books (Non-Fiction)
Review: 
The Reign of the Greyhounds

Moose, Bruce and the Goose

Reviewed by: 
Joan Dillon

Moose is a "mottled gray" greyhound pup, born into the wild and left alone when his mother and sisters are rescued by a local rancher. 

Bruce is a teenager who has aspirations of becoming a high school track star. 

DeGaule is a Canada Goose who had been the leader of his flock until wounded by a bullet fired illegally from a rifle. 

This unlikely cast of characters combine in a delightful story that will appeal to youngsters from the middle grades on up to high school. Even adults will find themselves chuckling at some of the situations that this unlikely trio gets into. 

Meeting at a Montana greyhound track where Moose and DeGaule totally disrupt the outcome of a race, they accompany Bruce home only to disrupt his mother's bridge party. The acion proceeds at a fast pace as the dog and the goose help Bruce train for the high school track team. At one point, DeGaulle returns to the wild only to return with 5,000 friends just before the state track championship which is decided by a most unusual photo finish. This book is an absolute delight from beginning to end. Highly recommended. 

Robert Scott McKinnon is a retired high school English teacher whose family raised greyhounds for many years. Residing in Great Falls, Montana, he is also the author of The Yellowstone: A Journey Home. 

The book is illustrated by Tom Quinn, a well known artist from Spokane, Washngton, who, in addition to illustrations, has painted murals on the sides of a number of buildings, etc. in the Spokane area.

Reprinted with permission from Celebrating Greyhounds: The Magazine, Fall, 1996. © Joan Dillon

Reviewed Publication: 

Moose, Bruce and the Goose

http://www.adopt-a-greyhound.org/sites/adopt-a-greyhound.org/files/publications/books/bc-mckinnon-s.jpg
By: 
Robert Scott McKinnon [Revised edition 1996 (paperback); First published 1969 (hard cover)]

Moose, Bruce and the Goose is about the journey of a retired Greyhound.

Available from National Greyhound Association, Abilene, Kansas $10 (includes shipping)

*Adoption Groups: This book is available for bulk purchases directly from the publisher: More Information.

Out of Print: 
0
Category: 
Other Greyhound Books (Fiction Books)
Review: 
Moose, Bruce and the Goose
Moose, Bruce and the Goose

Moose, Bruce and the Goose

Reviewed by: 
Joan Dillon

Moose is a "mottled gray" greyhound pup, born into the wild and left alone when his mother and sisters are rescued by a local rancher. 

Bruce is a teenager who has aspirations of becoming a high school track star. 

DeGaule is a Canada Goose who had been the leader of his flock until wounded by a bullet fired illegally from a rifle. 

This unlikely cast of characters combine in a delightful story that will appeal to youngsters from the middle grades on up to high school. Even adults will find themselves chuckling at some of the situations that this unlikely trio gets into. 

Meeting at a Montana greyhound track where Moose and DeGaule totally disrupt the outcome of a race, they accompany Bruce home only to disrupt his mother's bridge party. The acion proceeds at a fast pace as the dog and the goose help Bruce train for the high school track team. At one point, DeGaulle returns to the wild only to return with 5,000 friends just before the state track championship which is decided by a most unusual photo finish. This book is an absolute delight from beginning to end. Highly recommended. 

Robert Scott McKinnon is a retired high school English teacher whose family raised greyhounds for many years. Residing in Great Falls, Montana, he is also the author of The Yellowstone: A Journey Home. 

The book is illustrated by Tom Quinn, a well known artist from Spokane, Washngton, who, in addition to illustrations, has painted murals on the sides of a number of buildings, etc. in the Spokane area.

Reprinted with permission from Celebrating Greyhounds: The Magazine, Fall, 1996. © Joan Dillon

Reviewed Publication: 

Moose, Bruce and the Goose

http://www.adopt-a-greyhound.org/sites/adopt-a-greyhound.org/files/publications/books/bc-mckinnon-s.jpg
By: 
Robert Scott McKinnon [Revised edition 1996 (paperback); First published 1969 (hard cover)]

Moose, Bruce and the Goose is about the journey of a retired Greyhound.

Available from National Greyhound Association, Abilene, Kansas $10 (includes shipping)

*Adoption Groups: This book is available for bulk purchases directly from the publisher: More Information.

Out of Print: 
0
Category: 
Other Greyhound Books (Fiction Books)
Review: 
Moose, Bruce and the Goose

The Culture Clash

Reviewed by: 
Jody Frederick

If you share your life with dogs, you owe it to yourself and your canines to pick up a copy of Jean Donaldson's book The Culture Clash. It will give you new and amazing insight into dog behaviour that will provide you with ideas of how to improve your relationship and understanding of your best friend. The book emphasizes training but it is very basic. The everyday dog owner can learn a great deal about dog behaviour from this book even though they might not be interested in obedience competition. 

Donaldson starts by exploding the popular "Walt Disney dog" myth that suggests that dogs are moral, extremely intelligent beings that are capable of understanding and solving complex problems. For years, we have believed that dogs think, feel and act like humans. The truth (supported by scientific research) is that although dogs are great learners, they do not think abstractly, do not have morals, do not understand language, and cannot move mentally forward and backward through time. Therefore, many of the previous training methods and approaches to understanding dog behaviours are built on misinformation. 

When you bestow intelligence and morality, you bestow the responsibility that goes along with them. If the dog knows it's wrong to destroy furniture yet deliberately and maliciously does it, remembers the wrong he did and feels guilt, it feels like he merits a punishment, doesn't it? Well, that's just what dogs have been getting -- a lot of punishment. (page 13) 

Dogs cannot understand the difference between right and wrong. What they can understand is the difference between safe and dangerous. That is, chewing the sofa while the human is away is self-rewarding with no consequences (safe) but doing the same while the human is home has negative consequences (dangerous). Dogs are also incapable of recognizing the economic value of our possessions. Everything is a potential chew toy! 

Donaldson also explains the "eager-to-please" fallacy--the idea that our dogs are dying to do as we wish and furthermore know what we want of them. Again, this is based on our anthropomorphic vision of dog behaviour and intelligence. Dogs learn by the immediate consequences of their actions. Dogs are self-interested. If there is something in it for them, they will do it. If there is nothing in it for them, they require motivation. 

"The Dominance Panacea" is another myth that Donaldson takes apart. Ever since humans discovered pack order in wolves, dog owners have been explaining every conceivable dog-dog and human-dog interaction in terms of dominance. "Dogs misbehave or are disobedient because they haven't been shown who's boss." How many times have we heard that? Donaldson believes that this viewpoint amounts to yet another opportunity for punishment-based training methods. Behind a dog that rushes through doorways first, fails to come when called, or pulls on its leash is a human who has not taught the dog what is inappropriate. In other words, we should rule out lack of training before we immediately assume the dog is planning a coup of our leadership. 

Other important behaviours can be understood when you recognize that dogs are predators. Predatory behaviour results in searching, stalking, rushing, chasing, biting, and dissection. Furthermore, the dog is a pack animal and is programmed to be constantly around others to survive. Separation from the group activates behaviours that help reunite with the pack These behaviours include agitation, distress vocalizations, scratching, digging and chewing. 

Aggressive behaviour in domestic dogs is another issue that needs to be addressed, according to the author. Biting is natural, normal dog behaviour, which is why it is so prevalent. She states: Biting and threat displays (which are simply the indication of intention to bite) are how dogs settle both minor and major disputes and defend themselves from any perceived threat they cannot or opt not to flee from. In dog culture there are no letters to the editor, slanderous gossip and backstabbing, guilty feelings, democratic institutions or litigation lawyers. There are growls, snarls, snaps and bites. (page 57) 

The problem is that dogs have been domesticated into our culture which views biting as a betrayal of trust and is met with capital punishment. With these few examples, you can begin to see how very different our cultures truly are. 

To say that this book has been eye-opening for me is an understatement. Donaldson's frank and often humorous descriptions of dog behaviour have challenged my beliefs and values to their very core. I highly recommend this book to anyone who's interested in moving beyond the "Walt Disney dog" myth and seeing a dog for what it really is...and isn't.

Reprinted with permission from Celebrating Greyhounds: The Magazine, Winter, 1997. © Jody Frederick

Reviewed Publication: 

The Culture Clash

http://www.adopt-a-greyhound.org/sites/adopt-a-greyhound.org/files/publications/books/bc-donaldson-s.jpg
By: 
Jean Donaldson
Published by: 
James & Kenneth Publishers, Berkeley, CA
ISBN: 
1888047054
1996

excerpt from our review: If you share your life with dogs, you owe it to yourself and your canines to pick up a copy of Jean Donaldson's book The Culture Clash. It will give you new and amazing insight into dog behaviour that will provide you with ideas of how to improve your relationship and understanding of your best friend. The book emphasizes training but it is very basic. The everyday dog owner can learn a great deal about dog behaviour from this book even though they might not be interested in obedience competition.

Out of Print: 
0
Category: 
General Dog Training / Activities
Review: 
The Culture Clash
The Culture Clash

The Culture Clash

Reviewed by: 
Jody Frederick

If you share your life with dogs, you owe it to yourself and your canines to pick up a copy of Jean Donaldson's book The Culture Clash. It will give you new and amazing insight into dog behaviour that will provide you with ideas of how to improve your relationship and understanding of your best friend. The book emphasizes training but it is very basic. The everyday dog owner can learn a great deal about dog behaviour from this book even though they might not be interested in obedience competition. 

Donaldson starts by exploding the popular "Walt Disney dog" myth that suggests that dogs are moral, extremely intelligent beings that are capable of understanding and solving complex problems. For years, we have believed that dogs think, feel and act like humans. The truth (supported by scientific research) is that although dogs are great learners, they do not think abstractly, do not have morals, do not understand language, and cannot move mentally forward and backward through time. Therefore, many of the previous training methods and approaches to understanding dog behaviours are built on misinformation. 

When you bestow intelligence and morality, you bestow the responsibility that goes along with them. If the dog knows it's wrong to destroy furniture yet deliberately and maliciously does it, remembers the wrong he did and feels guilt, it feels like he merits a punishment, doesn't it? Well, that's just what dogs have been getting -- a lot of punishment. (page 13) 

Dogs cannot understand the difference between right and wrong. What they can understand is the difference between safe and dangerous. That is, chewing the sofa while the human is away is self-rewarding with no consequences (safe) but doing the same while the human is home has negative consequences (dangerous). Dogs are also incapable of recognizing the economic value of our possessions. Everything is a potential chew toy! 

Donaldson also explains the "eager-to-please" fallacy--the idea that our dogs are dying to do as we wish and furthermore know what we want of them. Again, this is based on our anthropomorphic vision of dog behaviour and intelligence. Dogs learn by the immediate consequences of their actions. Dogs are self-interested. If there is something in it for them, they will do it. If there is nothing in it for them, they require motivation. 

"The Dominance Panacea" is another myth that Donaldson takes apart. Ever since humans discovered pack order in wolves, dog owners have been explaining every conceivable dog-dog and human-dog interaction in terms of dominance. "Dogs misbehave or are disobedient because they haven't been shown who's boss." How many times have we heard that? Donaldson believes that this viewpoint amounts to yet another opportunity for punishment-based training methods. Behind a dog that rushes through doorways first, fails to come when called, or pulls on its leash is a human who has not taught the dog what is inappropriate. In other words, we should rule out lack of training before we immediately assume the dog is planning a coup of our leadership. 

Other important behaviours can be understood when you recognize that dogs are predators. Predatory behaviour results in searching, stalking, rushing, chasing, biting, and dissection. Furthermore, the dog is a pack animal and is programmed to be constantly around others to survive. Separation from the group activates behaviours that help reunite with the pack These behaviours include agitation, distress vocalizations, scratching, digging and chewing. 

Aggressive behaviour in domestic dogs is another issue that needs to be addressed, according to the author. Biting is natural, normal dog behaviour, which is why it is so prevalent. She states: Biting and threat displays (which are simply the indication of intention to bite) are how dogs settle both minor and major disputes and defend themselves from any perceived threat they cannot or opt not to flee from. In dog culture there are no letters to the editor, slanderous gossip and backstabbing, guilty feelings, democratic institutions or litigation lawyers. There are growls, snarls, snaps and bites. (page 57) 

The problem is that dogs have been domesticated into our culture which views biting as a betrayal of trust and is met with capital punishment. With these few examples, you can begin to see how very different our cultures truly are. 

To say that this book has been eye-opening for me is an understatement. Donaldson's frank and often humorous descriptions of dog behaviour have challenged my beliefs and values to their very core. I highly recommend this book to anyone who's interested in moving beyond the "Walt Disney dog" myth and seeing a dog for what it really is...and isn't.

Reprinted with permission from Celebrating Greyhounds: The Magazine, Winter, 1997. © Jody Frederick

Reviewed Publication: 

The Culture Clash

http://www.adopt-a-greyhound.org/sites/adopt-a-greyhound.org/files/publications/books/bc-donaldson-s.jpg
By: 
Jean Donaldson
Published by: 
James & Kenneth Publishers, Berkeley, CA
ISBN: 
1888047054
1996

excerpt from our review: If you share your life with dogs, you owe it to yourself and your canines to pick up a copy of Jean Donaldson's book The Culture Clash. It will give you new and amazing insight into dog behaviour that will provide you with ideas of how to improve your relationship and understanding of your best friend. The book emphasizes training but it is very basic. The everyday dog owner can learn a great deal about dog behaviour from this book even though they might not be interested in obedience competition.

Out of Print: 
0
Category: 
General Dog Training / Activities
Review: 
The Culture Clash

Caring for Your Older Dog

Reviewed by: 
Kate Bressler

As Greyhound adoption matures, so do our dogs. Greyhounds are now living longer, healthier lives than ever before. Many live to be fourteen and fifteen years old with some surviving to celebrate their sixteenth birthdays. 

Those of us who have dedicated our lives to the geriatric hound, constantly seek reference materials to help us care for our aging friends. This comprehensive little $10, 178-page book is one of the best I've found. 

Dr. Pinney, a practicing veterinarian in Texas, begins by explaining the canine aging process and methodically progresses through the seven chapters of the book: 

  1. The Aging Process and its Effects on Older Dogs 
  2. Preventive Health Care for Older Dogs 
  3. Diagnosing Illness in Older Dogs and Interpreting Laboratory Data
  4. Select Diseases and Disorders Affecting the Body Systems of Older Dogs 
  5. Clinical Signs and Complaints 
  6. Select First Aid Procedures 
  7. Euthanasia and Your Older Dog (a mere three pages) 

He stresses the need for preventive health care beginning with several pages devoted to nutrition. Dr. Pinney also thoroughly discusses and explains internal and external parasites; nail, ear, and dental care; grooming; and vaccinations before moving on to Chapter 3. 

Fourteen tables scattered throughout Caring for Your Older Dog illustrate Dietary Management of Disease in Older Dogs, Components of a Complete Blood Count (CBC), The Urinalysis and Its Interpretation; and Specialized Diagnostic Tests Utilized in Veterinary Medicine. These tables are in an easy-to-understand format, making them even more useful. 

My favorite feature of this book is its many lists. Each list or table gives several possible reasons for each symptom. Lists outline the causes of abdominal swelling; anorexia; coughing; incoordination, falling, and circling; hair loss or itching; constipation; seizures, and more. An useful table lists over-the-counter medications useful for first aid. 

Caring for Your Older Dog has seventy-six full-color photographs. Most of these photographs show clear examples of checking for anemia by examining gums; checking for jaundice in ears or eyes; for glaucoma and cataracts and more. Included are radiographs that are somewhat more difficult to make out for us laymen. If you have never seen heartworms, that pile of them on page 55 might shock you. 

Like all Barron's books, Caring for Your Older Dog is an incredible value: small enough to fit in the glovebox of your car or inexpensive enough to have one for the car and one for home. Once you add it to your canine-care library, this book will quickly become an invaluable resource.

Reprinted with permission from Celebrating Greyhounds: The Magazine, Summer, 1998. © Kate Bressler

Reviewed Publication: 

Caring for Your Older Dog

http://www.adopt-a-greyhound.org/sites/adopt-a-greyhound.org/files/publications/books/bc-pinney-s.jpg
A Comprehensive Guide to improve the quality of life and longevity of your older pet
By: 
Chris C. Pinney, DVM
Published by: 
Barrons Educational Series
ISBN: 
0812091493
Oct 1995

from our review: As Greyhound adoption matures, so do our dogs. Greyhounds are now living longer, healthier lives than ever before. Many live to be fourteen and fifteen years old with some surviving to celebrate their sixteenth birthdays. Those of us who have dedicated our lives to the geriatric hound, constantly seek reference materials to help us care for our aging friends. This comprehensive little $10, 178-page book is one of the best I've found.

Out of Print: 
0
Category: 
Health
Review: 
Caring for Your Older Dog
Caring for Your Older Dog

Caring for Your Older Dog

Reviewed by: 
Kate Bressler

As Greyhound adoption matures, so do our dogs. Greyhounds are now living longer, healthier lives than ever before. Many live to be fourteen and fifteen years old with some surviving to celebrate their sixteenth birthdays. 

Those of us who have dedicated our lives to the geriatric hound, constantly seek reference materials to help us care for our aging friends. This comprehensive little $10, 178-page book is one of the best I've found. 

Dr. Pinney, a practicing veterinarian in Texas, begins by explaining the canine aging process and methodically progresses through the seven chapters of the book: 

  1. The Aging Process and its Effects on Older Dogs 
  2. Preventive Health Care for Older Dogs 
  3. Diagnosing Illness in Older Dogs and Interpreting Laboratory Data
  4. Select Diseases and Disorders Affecting the Body Systems of Older Dogs 
  5. Clinical Signs and Complaints 
  6. Select First Aid Procedures 
  7. Euthanasia and Your Older Dog (a mere three pages) 

He stresses the need for preventive health care beginning with several pages devoted to nutrition. Dr. Pinney also thoroughly discusses and explains internal and external parasites; nail, ear, and dental care; grooming; and vaccinations before moving on to Chapter 3. 

Fourteen tables scattered throughout Caring for Your Older Dog illustrate Dietary Management of Disease in Older Dogs, Components of a Complete Blood Count (CBC), The Urinalysis and Its Interpretation; and Specialized Diagnostic Tests Utilized in Veterinary Medicine. These tables are in an easy-to-understand format, making them even more useful. 

My favorite feature of this book is its many lists. Each list or table gives several possible reasons for each symptom. Lists outline the causes of abdominal swelling; anorexia; coughing; incoordination, falling, and circling; hair loss or itching; constipation; seizures, and more. An useful table lists over-the-counter medications useful for first aid. 

Caring for Your Older Dog has seventy-six full-color photographs. Most of these photographs show clear examples of checking for anemia by examining gums; checking for jaundice in ears or eyes; for glaucoma and cataracts and more. Included are radiographs that are somewhat more difficult to make out for us laymen. If you have never seen heartworms, that pile of them on page 55 might shock you. 

Like all Barron's books, Caring for Your Older Dog is an incredible value: small enough to fit in the glovebox of your car or inexpensive enough to have one for the car and one for home. Once you add it to your canine-care library, this book will quickly become an invaluable resource.

Reprinted with permission from Celebrating Greyhounds: The Magazine, Summer, 1998. © Kate Bressler

Reviewed Publication: 

Caring for Your Older Dog

http://www.adopt-a-greyhound.org/sites/adopt-a-greyhound.org/files/publications/books/bc-pinney-s.jpg
A Comprehensive Guide to improve the quality of life and longevity of your older pet
By: 
Chris C. Pinney, DVM
Published by: 
Barrons Educational Series
ISBN: 
0812091493
Oct 1995

from our review: As Greyhound adoption matures, so do our dogs. Greyhounds are now living longer, healthier lives than ever before. Many live to be fourteen and fifteen years old with some surviving to celebrate their sixteenth birthdays. Those of us who have dedicated our lives to the geriatric hound, constantly seek reference materials to help us care for our aging friends. This comprehensive little $10, 178-page book is one of the best I've found.

Out of Print: 
0
Category: 
Health
Review: 
Caring for Your Older Dog

Career Success with Pets

Reviewed by: 
Kim Roehring

Many people these days are leaving their old jobs and expanding their career opportunities. They are opening their own businesses. Unfortunately many businesses fail due to the lack of planning of an operation, poor marketing and advertising, or inefficient use of resources. Kim Barber has written a book that all pet lovers can use as a reference guide to plan for their "new" career. She offers advice to get started and to stay in business in the areas of Kennel Management, Pet Supply Shop, Pet Sitting, Animal Photography and much more. Kim gives quick checklists to use in the planning and layout of your facility as well as lists of needed equipment. An invaluable reference. 

Kim Roehring writes book reviews for I Love Cats and lives with her five-year old greyhound, Money. Money just earned her CGC and is a TDI participant. Kim's has three Labradors, three cats, three horses and sixty-three rabbits which she breeds and shows. Money goes on rabbit show trips with me. I am an LD teacher at a Middle School and hope to incorporate Money into one of the Special Education programs we have at our school. Although we are not members of a greyhound adoptation group, Money and I are active in dog adoption through one of the pet assistance leagues here in Virginia. 

Reprinted with permission from Celebrating Greyhounds: The Magazine, Summer, 1997. © Kim Roehring

Reviewed Publication: 

Career Success with Pets

http://www.adopt-a-greyhound.org/sites/adopt-a-greyhound.org/files/publications/books/bc-barber-l.jpg
By: 
Kim Barber
Published by: 
MacMillan General Reference, New York, New York
Out of Print: 
0
Review: 
Career Success with Pets
Career Success with Pets

Career Success with Pets

Reviewed by: 
Kim Roehring

Many people these days are leaving their old jobs and expanding their career opportunities. They are opening their own businesses. Unfortunately many businesses fail due to the lack of planning of an operation, poor marketing and advertising, or inefficient use of resources. Kim Barber has written a book that all pet lovers can use as a reference guide to plan for their "new" career. She offers advice to get started and to stay in business in the areas of Kennel Management, Pet Supply Shop, Pet Sitting, Animal Photography and much more. Kim gives quick checklists to use in the planning and layout of your facility as well as lists of needed equipment. An invaluable reference. 

Kim Roehring writes book reviews for I Love Cats and lives with her five-year old greyhound, Money. Money just earned her CGC and is a TDI participant. Kim's has three Labradors, three cats, three horses and sixty-three rabbits which she breeds and shows. Money goes on rabbit show trips with me. I am an LD teacher at a Middle School and hope to incorporate Money into one of the Special Education programs we have at our school. Although we are not members of a greyhound adoptation group, Money and I are active in dog adoption through one of the pet assistance leagues here in Virginia. 

Reprinted with permission from Celebrating Greyhounds: The Magazine, Summer, 1997. © Kim Roehring

Reviewed Publication: 

Career Success with Pets

http://www.adopt-a-greyhound.org/sites/adopt-a-greyhound.org/files/publications/books/bc-barber-l.jpg
By: 
Kim Barber
Published by: 
MacMillan General Reference, New York, New York
Out of Print: 
0
Review: 
Career Success with Pets

Greyhounds

Reviewed by: 
Joan Dillon

When I first heard that there was a new greyhound book available, and that it cost only $6.95, I had some serious doubts about its quality. After all, $6.95 doesn't buy much these days. However, I was in for a most pleasant surprise when I purchased a copy of Greyhounds by D. Caroline Coile, Ph.D., Barrons Educational Series, Inc (1996). 

The first thing which caught my eye was the cover portrayal of a gorgeous fawn greyhound with the most soulful eyes. The second was the quantity of color photos available throughout the book (forty nine in all), plus a number of pencil sketches. By the way, don't be mislead by the Ph.D. after the author's name; this is not some stuffy educational textbook! Rather, it is a delightful rendition by someone who obviously not only knows and loves greyhounds but also cares deeply for their welfare. I think that most readers of this book, whether they own a former racing greyhound or an AKC greyhound, will agree with the author that "once that greyhound sashays through your front door, hops onto your couch, and turns those lustrous doe eyes upon you, your life may never be the same" and "you'll know that it has made the transition and formally adopted you the first time you catch it doing something utterly silly and so very unlike the public greyhound persona." 

The only fault I found with the book is in the graphics area. The particular type chosen for the text, coupled with not justifying it (having the type spaced evenly across the page so all lines are the same width, makes it very tiring to read for any length of time. 

As a greyhound owner since 1979, the only lapse I detected was in the collar recommendations. Although almost every photo of a greyhound wearing a collar pictured the humane choke collar which is used and recommended by most greyhound adoption organizations, there was no mention of this type of collar at all. Instead, it was recommended that the greyhound owner purchase a flat buckle collar for around the house and a nylon choke collar for leash walking. With the humane choker, only one collar is necessary, as long as the dog is supervised. It works as a choke collar when the dog is being leash walked and as a regular collar at other times. 

Although I am a long time greyhound owner, even I learned several things from reading this book. For instance, in dealing with the dreaded injury to the end of the tail, there is a pressure point on the underside of the tail near its base. Also, although I have long suspected it, one of the stated "predispositions" affecting greyhounds is osteosarcoma. Additionally, I may have even found the real reason a greyhound died following a routine neutering operation some years back when a tube placed down his throat ruptured something causing massive bleeding. Apparently, some dogs may have a collapsed trachea and in these dogs, the rings of the trachea are not formed correctly and the upper part of the trachea may collapse inward during heavy breathing. 

All in all, I found Greyhounds to be a very informative book and an outstanding reference manual which all greyhound owners will want to add to their collections.

Reprinted with permission from Celebrating Greyhounds: The Magazine, Summer, 1996. © Joan Dillon

Reviewed Publication: 

Greyhounds - A Complete Pet Owner's Manual

http://www.adopt-a-greyhound.org/sites/adopt-a-greyhound.org/files/publications/books/bc-coile-s.jpg
By: 
D. Caroline Coile, Ph.D
Published by: 
Barrons Educational Series
ISBN: 
0812093143
1996

Everything About Adoption, Purchase, Care, Nutrition, Behavior, and Training. This is a very well written book with great color photographs at a very affordable price.

Out of Print: 
0
Category: 
Essential Reading
Review: 
Greyhounds
Greyhounds

Greyhounds

Reviewed by: 
Joan Dillon

When I first heard that there was a new greyhound book available, and that it cost only $6.95, I had some serious doubts about its quality. After all, $6.95 doesn't buy much these days. However, I was in for a most pleasant surprise when I purchased a copy of Greyhounds by D. Caroline Coile, Ph.D., Barrons Educational Series, Inc (1996). 

The first thing which caught my eye was the cover portrayal of a gorgeous fawn greyhound with the most soulful eyes. The second was the quantity of color photos available throughout the book (forty nine in all), plus a number of pencil sketches. By the way, don't be mislead by the Ph.D. after the author's name; this is not some stuffy educational textbook! Rather, it is a delightful rendition by someone who obviously not only knows and loves greyhounds but also cares deeply for their welfare. I think that most readers of this book, whether they own a former racing greyhound or an AKC greyhound, will agree with the author that "once that greyhound sashays through your front door, hops onto your couch, and turns those lustrous doe eyes upon you, your life may never be the same" and "you'll know that it has made the transition and formally adopted you the first time you catch it doing something utterly silly and so very unlike the public greyhound persona." 

The only fault I found with the book is in the graphics area. The particular type chosen for the text, coupled with not justifying it (having the type spaced evenly across the page so all lines are the same width, makes it very tiring to read for any length of time. 

As a greyhound owner since 1979, the only lapse I detected was in the collar recommendations. Although almost every photo of a greyhound wearing a collar pictured the humane choke collar which is used and recommended by most greyhound adoption organizations, there was no mention of this type of collar at all. Instead, it was recommended that the greyhound owner purchase a flat buckle collar for around the house and a nylon choke collar for leash walking. With the humane choker, only one collar is necessary, as long as the dog is supervised. It works as a choke collar when the dog is being leash walked and as a regular collar at other times. 

Although I am a long time greyhound owner, even I learned several things from reading this book. For instance, in dealing with the dreaded injury to the end of the tail, there is a pressure point on the underside of the tail near its base. Also, although I have long suspected it, one of the stated "predispositions" affecting greyhounds is osteosarcoma. Additionally, I may have even found the real reason a greyhound died following a routine neutering operation some years back when a tube placed down his throat ruptured something causing massive bleeding. Apparently, some dogs may have a collapsed trachea and in these dogs, the rings of the trachea are not formed correctly and the upper part of the trachea may collapse inward during heavy breathing. 

All in all, I found Greyhounds to be a very informative book and an outstanding reference manual which all greyhound owners will want to add to their collections.

Reprinted with permission from Celebrating Greyhounds: The Magazine, Summer, 1996. © Joan Dillon

Reviewed Publication: 

Greyhounds - A Complete Pet Owner's Manual

http://www.adopt-a-greyhound.org/sites/adopt-a-greyhound.org/files/publications/books/bc-coile-s.jpg
By: 
D. Caroline Coile, Ph.D
Published by: 
Barrons Educational Series
ISBN: 
0812093143
1996

Everything About Adoption, Purchase, Care, Nutrition, Behavior, and Training. This is a very well written book with great color photographs at a very affordable price.

Out of Print: 
0
Category: 
Essential Reading
Review: 
Greyhounds

Child Proofing Your Dog

Reviewed by: 
Joan Dillon

If you already have a dog and are expecting a baby, already have kids and want to get a dog, or already have kids and dogs and want to improve the status quo, then this is the book for you. 

To quote the authors, Childproofing is about preventing the preventable as much as that is humanly possible. Thats exactly what this book is about. It is no promise that your dog or any other dog will never harm a child. But it does give you many steps and exercises that you can do with your dog and your child to help them avoid some of the most common problems. 

This book will help you to train your dog to deal with children in ways that are both easy to understand and fun to do. It will also provide you with a good foundation for understanding and communicating with your dog. 

As far as I am concerned this book is the Bible for dealing with kid and dog problems. It covers everything from getting your dog ready to accept a new baby to avoiding problems when bringing the baby home. It covers the subjects of dogs and toddlers and dogs and small children. It even gives instructions for various games for children to play with their dog which will help the dog to understand its proper place in the family. In addition, there is also a section on dogproofing your child to help them understand the rules to follow in dealing with strange dogs. 

Brian Kilcommons is one of the countrys foremost dog trainers as well as the only American to study under the renowned Barbara Woodhouse. He was also the official trainer for the PBS series, The Gentle Doctor: Veterinary Medicine. 

This book provides wonderful insight into the reasons why dogs act the way they do around children as well as ways for dealing with any potential problems before they become major problems. Highly recommended.

Reprinted with permission from Celebrating Greyhounds: The Magazine, Winter, 1996. © Joan Dillon

Reviewed Publication: 

Childproofing Your Dog

http://www.adopt-a-greyhound.org/sites/adopt-a-greyhound.org/files/publications/books/bc-kilcommons-s.jpg
A Complete Guide to Preparing Your Dog for the Children in Your Life
By: 
Brian Kilcommons and Sarah Wilson
Published by: 
Warner Books
ISBN: 
0446670162
Apr 1st 1994

Master dog trainer and author of Good Owners, Great Dogs, Brian Kilcommons shows readers how to encourage children and dogs to be perfect companions, in a comprehensive manual that demonstrates how to train an older dog to acept an infant, choose the right breed, and more

Out of Print: 
0
Category: 
Essential Reading
General Dog Training / Activities
Review: 
Child Proofing Your Dog
Child Proofing Your Dog

Child Proofing Your Dog

Reviewed by: 
Joan Dillon

If you already have a dog and are expecting a baby, already have kids and want to get a dog, or already have kids and dogs and want to improve the status quo, then this is the book for you. 

To quote the authors, Childproofing is about preventing the preventable as much as that is humanly possible. Thats exactly what this book is about. It is no promise that your dog or any other dog will never harm a child. But it does give you many steps and exercises that you can do with your dog and your child to help them avoid some of the most common problems. 

This book will help you to train your dog to deal with children in ways that are both easy to understand and fun to do. It will also provide you with a good foundation for understanding and communicating with your dog. 

As far as I am concerned this book is the Bible for dealing with kid and dog problems. It covers everything from getting your dog ready to accept a new baby to avoiding problems when bringing the baby home. It covers the subjects of dogs and toddlers and dogs and small children. It even gives instructions for various games for children to play with their dog which will help the dog to understand its proper place in the family. In addition, there is also a section on dogproofing your child to help them understand the rules to follow in dealing with strange dogs. 

Brian Kilcommons is one of the countrys foremost dog trainers as well as the only American to study under the renowned Barbara Woodhouse. He was also the official trainer for the PBS series, The Gentle Doctor: Veterinary Medicine. 

This book provides wonderful insight into the reasons why dogs act the way they do around children as well as ways for dealing with any potential problems before they become major problems. Highly recommended.

Reprinted with permission from Celebrating Greyhounds: The Magazine, Winter, 1996. © Joan Dillon

Reviewed Publication: 

Childproofing Your Dog

http://www.adopt-a-greyhound.org/sites/adopt-a-greyhound.org/files/publications/books/bc-kilcommons-s.jpg
A Complete Guide to Preparing Your Dog for the Children in Your Life
By: 
Brian Kilcommons and Sarah Wilson
Published by: 
Warner Books
ISBN: 
0446670162
Apr 1st 1994

Master dog trainer and author of Good Owners, Great Dogs, Brian Kilcommons shows readers how to encourage children and dogs to be perfect companions, in a comprehensive manual that demonstrates how to train an older dog to acept an infant, choose the right breed, and more

Out of Print: 
0
Category: 
Essential Reading
General Dog Training / Activities
Review: 
Child Proofing Your Dog